About your Search

20130106
20130114
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)
in this environment if you are an investor in the market? >> so it depends on your starting position. if you have already taken on a lot of risk, you've done really well and time now to trim it back, we have economic uncertainty, we have political uncertainty, and we have a certain amount of policy uncertainty coming out of europe. we should take some chips off the table. risk assets. equities and higher bonds that have done extremely well. if you are conservatively positioned, stay there, because there's still value, although not great value. prices have really about an artificially elevated, and the most incredible thing is keep an eye on the fed because the fed is the only thing that's keeping valuations above fundamentals. if the fed steps away, then valuations will come down. >> all right. we will leave it there. mohammed, always wonderful to have you on the program. thanks so much. >> my pleasure. thank you, maria. >> we'll see you soon. mohammed elarian joining us. up next, we're on the money. a bank ceo that says the fiscal cliff deal is a raw one. why he says this country is going to hel
2.5% or so, these companies have figured out how to make money in a slow growth environment so combined with that, 4%, 5% earnings growth, that's reasonable in the kind of environment that we're in right now. >> no great shakes in terms of earnings growth. >> no. >> but good enough is what you're saying. >> that's right. i think it's good enough. >> what's priced into the market though? i mean, we've got expectations that we'll see much higher prof materialize or what? >> you know, really i think the market, you know, the p.e. ratio, if you look at valuations as far as that metric goes, i mean, the market is not willing to take the pes very high, may inch higher, 14, 14.5 or so, by the end of next year. the market knows we're in a slow growth environment. we're not going to get strong gdp, and it's not willing to assign much of a pe to these earnings. that's going to be a continuation, but next year i think investor confidence is going to improve a little. it's really lagged in this rally, so i think we're just going to be able to inch it up enough to where we have a decent yea
environment so attractive and really few alternatives. is it really a function of the global economy, or is it more a function of this money that needs to find a place to go and u.s. equities seems to be best looking game in town? >> well, you know, i do think it's a lill bit of the latter. when you start looking at the velocity of the money, not trying to get too into the financial jargon, but we do have an issue where people are still seeking out safe money. however, if you look at growth of bank lending, commercial bank lending, what we call a credit growth, it's above 6% right now, so we do have banking and financial organizations wanting to lend money, and as they do that, that's going to create the capital to give those fundamentals that we sort of have forgotten about, but there's no denying that when the federal reserve is printing 85 billion a month it will have an effect. keep in mind, still looking at 8%, 10%, s&p corporate earnings growth. let's not get into an argument about top line growth. >> you're talking about the fourth quarter, 8% to 10% in the fourth quarter? >>
consider this a hostile environment? social security administration reprimanding an employee whose coworker says he continuously passed gas. the agency later rescinded the punishment against the employee. i just don't know where to go with this. but is this a hostile work environment, eamon? >> i don't know. i'm just glad i'm here in the studio by myself, tyler. i'm not with you guys. i have no idea -- >> maybe we're glad we're not with you. >> how small is the cubicle, that the question. when we are in the workplace with other people, we have to deal with other people and all of their weird stuff. some of it is really weird and some of it is offensive and that's part of being a human being. >> i guess a lot of things are part after being a human being. how about you, jane? i'm interesting to hear -- >> i know, i had brothers, husband, i know all about this. my feeling is, that you know, some people obviously can't lep it. but there are product out there. gas begone. go to gasbegone.com. where the tag line is, don't blame the dog. which, by the way, i have. they have cushions. i did somethi
to be an economic and political environment. that's going to be the story for 2013. >> we get a lot of people who come in who it seems to me lately there's a big divergence. there are those who are optimistic about things and think things will go well. others that say, forget it, we've seen all the gains. which camp would you put yourself in? >> i guess i'm not wholistically in either camp. it's more an optimist than a pessimist. we've seen stock correlations begin to fall a little bit. that's encouraging. it says that investors are begin to go loor fop companies that figure out how to make money in a slow growth environment. not sure what the indices will do, but i think the companies that are positioned to save other people company. i was thinking about the people who sell cnbc their coffee cups. you don't do that. somebody has figured out how to do that on large scale and make a lot of money doing it. so those kinds of companies we're going to look for. that means selectivity. that means looking in place that's we don't like from a mook row point of view such as europe. >> but from the average
an environment of better economic growth. rates might go higher. we think the immediate part of the curve is probably the safest place for the investors who are looking or think rates might be going up. then the other is you need to play the revenue space. there's a lot of high quality credits out there. but the yields are low. you're not really getting compensated. from a risk reward perspective, like health care and transportation, like housing and education offer a lot of value with not a lot of risk. >> so tell me how the fed plays into all of this, peter. there was all that noise last week about the division among fed members on how long the stimulus program should continue or will continue. if rates stay low and they don't fall any further, what's the impact of the growth in the muni bond market? how does that play into it? >> that's a great question. that's one we're talking about here as well. i think it's important to realize that the fed was only beginning to talk about having a debate or a discussion about removing that qe. so they've been anchoring on the long end of the marke
market sounds like a bull compared to that sort of an environment. >> let's talk about what harry just said though because he talked about the large umbrella-type situations that are really going to impact. demographics. >> yeah. >> the fact that the retail investor is gone. we're not going to have the same level of interest in stocks over the long term. he's expecting a big crash second half of the year. >> yeah. he's absolutely right. we've had bun buyer since 666 on the s&p in '09, the corporation itself. nobody else is in this buyer. can you imagine if somebody else does show up for a day or two? we could have a much better market. >> what's going to take us to those all-time highs, what area of the market do you want to be in to ride that wave? >> the multi-nationals. lagged the last couple of years. emerging market economies starting to do a bit better, and those companies that are geared in that direction. look, some of the u.s. companies will do fine, too. earnings are a question mark. that's -- that's part of the problem, but i think as financial and systemic risk mitigate som
much money. the deposit growth here is unbelievable. but in this environment, people want net interest margin. they want the bank to make more money or more mortgages. >> some banks out there, just declined only six basis points. that's how optimistic some on wall street will be going into this quarter. the sequential decline, it's 3.56 for the fourth quarter from 3.66 in the third. as you mentioned, ten-base point decline. so that picture has been dimming a bit. total lending has increased. >> not enough to offset the incredible increase in the deposits. what did they take in over -- >> $30 billion in the quarter. >> 12% annualized. even with that rescinding of the insurance beyond 250,000, still deposit flows. yet you can't put it into productive loans or you don't want to because you worry about credit quality and we end up with contracting energy -- >> look, we're at a moment where i don't think anybody who's got a mortgage, they know they're getting a good price. the ohio regionals are going to do better. that welgs is now a sale. look, wells could go to 33. if it had been to 32,
environment. if the yield curve starts to stephen as we've seen in the -- to stephen as we've seen in the first weeks of 2013, that will eliminate net interest margin pressure. profitability should improve for the group. >> how much do you care about what's going on in washington over the next two months? >> i think that's important because the austerity measures being talked about in washington will slow general economic growth in the country. and as you know, that's a real driver for bank loan growth. and so if those austerity measures are too much and puts us into possibly a recession or just slower growth, that will affect the outlook for the banks. i think you're going to see that the housing market's going to continue to grow. and that's going to be a real driver to the success of the banks this year. >> okay. now in your note to clients, you say that your four best ideas -- i'll list them. walk us through why you like them. you like discover financial services, fifth third bancorp, pnc financial, and wells fargo. >> yes, when you hook at starting with the last one, wells far
into recession. it's been in a recession type environment for a while. and the only grimace of hope is that the chinese economy has been showing signs of growth and the japanese are earmarking trying to get their growth profile. it's a race to the bottom. last year, there was a lot of risk that people thought we were going to have and didn't happen and then this year, thought there would be a massive allocation out of equities. i think that shows the first quarter is not going to be a one shot off the the risk markets. >> george, thanks for joining us this morning. we appreciate that. and now let's just remind you what else is still to come. two of the biggest names in hedge funds are locking horns over herbalife. we'll tell you what you need to know, coming up. with hotwire's low prices, we can afford to take an extra trip this year. first boston... then san francisco. hotwire checks the competitions' rates every day so they can guarantee their low prices. so our hotels were half price. ♪ h-o-t-w-i-r-e... ♪ hotwire.com ♪ [ male announcer ] some day, your life will flash befor
well in the current environment. you can't survive in this industry unless you continue to cut costs. we've got a great track record, frankly, over the last five years of delivering, you know, circa 100 million pounds of cost savings year on year. we intend to do that going forward. >> and joining us with more, founder and managing director at neeve capital. thanks for joining us. how tough is if for the gross? tough for morrison's. we get tesco tomorrow. >> i think it is tough and goes beyond the economy. i think what's happened is to some extent people are prioritizing spending on other things over food. you've seen so much food inflation the last two, three years that people almost prefer to spend it on treat like apple, for example, or clothing. what that actually has meant is people are discovering or rediscovering that it's cool enough to shop, and people have discovered you can get good quality stuff at really much cheaper prices. and i think in other terms, what people are doing is they're shopping on convenience. they want to go? where closer to them. they don't actually lik
talk about just the overall economic environment. they say there were a lot of challenges that the industry faced during the last year, including continued low interest rates and elevated unemployment. though, they're not necessarily saying great things about what they see in the economy or at least what they had seen over the last year. only comes in one take at a time. >> where, let me see? >> keep going. >> mine does. >> mine over here. >> i got to go pop out into the next thing during the next thing. >> no. wells forgo at this point 34.99 bid. so no longer actually trading higher on this. i don't know what the metric that came out, but two cents ahead on better than expected write now. >> all right. >> okay. >> talk to an analyst. >> we're going to talk to an analyst and get him on the phone. let's get a quick check on the markets. the dow falling -- would open about 12 points lower. nasdaq off by two points. s&p 500 virtually unchanged. overseas in asia, as we do a quick fly around you can see we do have a little bit of bad news. shanghai composite off close to 2% on
it is that they have no intention of doing, anyway. basically, we live in an environment where things are going to continue to change and businesses are going to feel money if they feel there's an end demand that justifies that. there's end demand in china, end demand globally and moderate end demand in the u.s. the reality is businesses have done relatively well for the last two or three years and will continue to. >> real quickly, herbalife later this week will be making a big presentation trying to defend itself from bill ackmann. your thoughts? >> look, i happen to feel that waging your short selling campaign on the air waves a way of dictating stock price, i am personally uncomfortable with. i think it's the wrong way to go about investing because it raises all these questions of are you making a legitimate analysis of the underlying business of the company or are you trying to shift the momentum in order to make money off the stock direction? >> you don't think that bill ackmann is going out, and then selling without us knowing? >> no, i don't believe that. i just don't think that's the
very low. by historical standards. though they are starting to tick up. the default environment is still relatively benign. one of the things that i think gets lost on investors is since 2008 we have refinanced the entire high yield market. there is two ben fritz that from. one is you clearly have a lower interest rate because of lower rates but the second thing we've done is push out maturity. even if there is weakness, which we would not rule out, most companies are pretty well positioned to survive that and they don't have near term mature its. which is always a concern from a high yield investors because, you know, banks can be fickle. we know that. so from a credit standpoint, things are very strong. >> how much go you take into kri consideration, the macro economy, how much does it play when you're putting together a portfolio. >> macro sets the guard rail of the idea. you will deemphasize home builders or building products. right now for example, we are concerned about europe. from the standpoint of credit, we look at european exposure and incorporate that. you can see we
we like wells fargo a lot. they get hurt in a low rate environment, they'll be helped a tremendous amount when short rates move up, and investors have not yet been willing to believe that the mortgage profits are sustainable. even though wells has got 30% market share of the mortgage market, which over time should be a positive. it's just they're not willing to give them full credit for it yet. >> moshe, thanks for your time. >> thanks very much. >> i did want to discuss some breaking news on morgan stanley. the company, a number of news outlets reporting job cuts coming there. we can confirm and clarify some of those reports. morgan stanley sources close to the company indicating they will cut about 6% of its overall institutional securities, and infrastructure staff. those cuts will total 1,600 jobs, half would be international, half will be domestic. again, 6% of securities and infrastructure. now, putting that in perspective, the company has 57,000 total employees. some have reported 6% overall, that is not correct. again, if you do the math, it would be 1,600 total. they've be
. that's the bleed air. and that bleed air usually does everything from controlling the environment within the cabin, the heating and the cooling, onboard electronics. what makes the dreamliner so different, so unique, is the amount of innovation that's gone in to using these lithium ion batteries in order to run the electronics on the plane. well, part of the problem here is, you're taking an amount of electricity that is coming off of these generators, in a very confined and small space, andrew, i mean this would be different if you were in the middle of a power plant. you'd say no problem. companies do this all the time. now you're trying to do this inside of an airplane. we should point out, this has gone through certification at the faa, repeated testing. it's not like they're just throwing these planes up there and there hasn't been any kind of safety checks. they went through extensive tests. if the issue now is was there, and this is something i think we're going to hear about in the next couple of days, is there a specific, perhaps malfunction with some of the electronics a
year for the s&p. it'll get you to 1,550? >> we are in a mid single digit equities environment. it's not horrible as long as you're not expecting something that's, you know, that's 10%. >> look at some of these releases. i'm very impressed with the isms for services. very impressed with capital goods, factory order spending, factories isms, even the employment report showed good hours worked in income. are we underestimating the economy? forget washington, put that aside. >> are you underestimating the economy? it'll be 3% instead of 2%? >> it could be. let's put it this way. if you look, for example, at the cbo budget numbers, they are looking for this thing to get to 3%, 4%, 5%, over the next two or three years, i think those are silly numbers. could we be in the high twos? not without a question. especially if you can unlock this lack of business confidence that's out there, that to me is the most important. >> i love the fact that gold is falling almost on a daily basis. because when gold falls, people are investing in more productive assets. reminds me of the '80s and '90s. >>
and suburban environments particularly. because what we're looking at in montana is not quite the same as what we may be looking at in chicago or places around the nation. >> cynthia -- >> what do people need them for in montana? what do people need them for in montana? i grew up in alabama, in deepest, reddest alabama. my father loved hunting. i grew up with shotguns and rifles in the house. he never -- it was a rural area. he never felt the need to have an assault weapon. the deer weren't armed. so why do you need an assault weapon? i don't understand -- [ overlapping speakers ] >> i did not say assault weapon. >> why do you need one? >> i did not say an assault weapon. what i'm saying is when you're putting a solution in place we're still going to have to be mindful or the compliancy in chicago and new york city versus people in the big west. people such as residents in montana or the dakotas. we're going to have to be mindful. i'm not saying i'm defending people having assault weapons. those are weapons of war and they too often get in the hands of people that hurt folks throughout america
in this environment. they were supposed to be gamestop's salvation, instead down more than 15%. can you believe that? that seems like maybe management is -- they're not ready for this. maybe they don't have as good of a handle on things as they think. plus the new video game consoles that bulls are excited about do get released, they might include technology that makes it so only the original user could play that game. that would be something, right? beyond the ailing used game business, gamestop plans to grow the digital business, selling games over the internet, dramatically over the next couple of years. but, i don't see how they compete against more established online players. fact is, gamestop has to compete with amazon on way too many fronts. they sell the same gaming hardware and software, does digital down loads too, letting you buy and download games online, amazon's on fire here and they do it really well. and amazon makes it easy to find and buy used video games by connecting you with vendors and individuals all over the world who want to sell. you don't want to be in competition with ama
and get some of the issues out of the way. >> we've lived in this environment for the last 18 months, one big disaster after another. everyone is waiting for the policy response, comes at the 11th hour and 59th minute. this is a pattern everyone has gotten used to but the fiscal cliff and the debt ceiling are the last big tail risks we think of the tail risks that we have to worry about, saw we would say once we get past that over the next several months we think it will lift a little bit of a cloud and investors will take risks. >> good to see you. >> good to see you. >> thanks so much for joining us. >> bob, thanks to you as well. ten minutes to go before we close it up. the dow jones industrial average holding on to a gain of 50 points. >> well, this herbalife soap opera is continuing. herb greenberg is coming up. all over the big move in the stock. take a look. up 3.25% right now. we'll show you what's behind it. >> and can you believe the iphone was only introduced five years ago? it is true. five years ago today, in fact, so here's a trivia question for you. the iphone alone is wort
normal, if you will, in a lot of these companies given the fact that the regulatory environment is getting worse and globalization is not necessarily on their side where it was so many years ago? is this going to be the new normal? well, i don't think so. here's the question. will the politicians get it right? will we go over the cliff, another debt ceiling and if we don't we could have a very robust capital markets this year, an that's what encourages me for the big money centers. for the smaller guys starved for loan growth and margin pressures they will be buyers. the really small guys will be the sellers and you'll see a lot of m & a opportunity out here. >> jason this morning you raised estimates on three banks. you lowered estimates on nine banks. tell me what was behind that. you're expecting the quarter to be what, more negative than positive for the sector overall? how do you see it? >> fine tuning here and there with overall estimate. i think generally for the earnings for the quarter. we think about half our banks will beat expectations. half miss. if you think during
are actually behind the counter in dispensaries, and so it's a very safe, secure, highly regulated environment that we operate in. >> okay. so 18 states have now passed medical marijuana laws. 18 states, so you -- you operate -- you operate already in california. you operate in canada. you've got dispensers coming to market in arizona in a matter of weeks. >> correct. >> what when are you likely to break into the remaining states? what's the plan for growth? >> that's a very good question because we are not just about medical marijuana. our technology crosses many boundaries in the traditional pharmacy retailing business, whether it's retail pharmacies, institutional pharmacy plays, doctor offices, hospice, long-term care, so our solution really is very broad scope and has a tremendous value proposition in traditional pharmacy and in traditional health care. in terms of medical marijuana we are on a state-by-state awareness, put if in aware ney. every state sen acting its own laws and regulations so we're currently enacting the rules in recently passed state like connecticut and massachusetts.
's there on the sidelines, and yet this market keeps going higher because of this interest rate environment, because of the easy money from central bankers. do you still see that kind of conviction on -- on the part of big buyers? >> yes, i do, and i think as we said, the global p myois telling you that we're coming from a dismal place. if you bag back to the fiscal collapse that we went through worldwide, particularly i look to china, for the impact that china continues to have on the global economy. the united states is again demonstrating, may not be the growth rate that we want, but it is in fact heading in the right direction which is why the asset class of exsis should come back into favor. we've been out of favor for years at this point. the weekly money flows we just saw, the first time we've seen positive growth. >> exactly. >> i think that money has been spent quite frankly so that's a tough trade, but at this particular point market has digested what it's going to digest. put in a great first two weeks of january, and i believe the money flows should and will continue into the united stat
's session. nokia on strong surge sales. the company did warn that competitive environment though remains challenging. molly corp plummeting after 2013 revenue and case flows would be weaker than expected due to falling rare earth prices. and super value, which has been in the news lately, says it plans to sell five retail grocery clans to an investor group. the price tag, $3.3 billion. as we continue on power lunch we are waiting for president obama to set to name the white house chief of staff jack lew as new treasury chief. but there are a number of people, including some on the floor, who are afraid of mr. lew, heading up treasury. we will talk about that when we come back as you look at this live picture from the white house. i've always had to keep my eye on her... but, i didn't always watch out for myself. with so much noise about health care... i tuned it all out. with unitedhealthcare, i get information that matters... my individual health profile. not random statistics. they even reward me for addressing my health risks. so i'm doing fine... but she's still going to give me a he
and restaurants to suit every taste and nationality. >> part of the concept was to create an environment, when people came in, they didn't feel like they were in a hospital. >> what's wrong with-- i mean, this is a hospital. what's wrong with looking like a hospital? >> 'cause nobody really wants to go to a hospital. >> would you go back? >> oh, i'm going back this fall, yeah. >> why? >> i'm going back to see my doctor and have a checkup again. > he'll have to take a 22-hour flight. but there's even an upside to that. is it true that i can pay for a checkup with frequent flyer miles? >> well, we do have a very unique relationship with thai airways. so you can buy a ticket, you can use frequent flyer mileage to get your check-up. >> whatever it takes to get your business. >> and this is not the only hospital trying to outsource healthcare, is it? >> oh, my goodness, no. [chuckles] yes, we certainly have not gone unnoticed. there are hospitals throughout asia, throughout india. >> up next, india competes for the market in foreign patients. >> that's the ambition, that india should become the wor
and also the competitive environment. obviously a lot of phones coming out at ces and across the spectrum. but let's be clear. a lot of work hard for nokia. 0% gain is not necessarily the start of a turnaround per se at this company. >> and morgan stanley, if you're thinking about buy microsoft, windows 8 disappointing. i do like to -- a lot of people call in on mad money, they want to talk about low dollar stocks. clearwire. nokia. supervalu, all big wins. typically speculation -- speculation is really bad, we have to be involved with pfizer, you know, you should be in merck. the percentage wins here are staggering and a lot of people hit it big. by the way, sirius worked out, too. >> at the same time when you have a low priced stock like that, there is a great deal of risk and i know you point that out many times. i won't enmention many of these until they pierce that $3 level. >> but i was skeptical and this is one of those rare times where skepticism for supervalu, skepticism for clearwire because it was at a dollar not take long ago and it turns out they're a very valuable company. >
parts of the world. as far as the current environment, it's a good place for them to we, focused on the u.s. even though our growth is not exceptional, it's still solid and better than other markets to be in. >> looking towards next week, morgan stanley, goldman sachs, bank of america out on thursday. what sort of growth rates are we going to see for these guys? how easy is the -- first of all, are they going the be flatted by easy xait comparisons? >> they're going to be very flattered by easy pairsons. there were a lot of eva chavrnlgs where the value of their bonds decreased. so they hurt a lot of their bonds. but sequentially from last quarter, it's not a large growth. 6/it's going to make them look a little better. >> what is going to be the key report for you or the key thing to focus on? >> as far as wells fargo, i would say what they have to say about the housing market. is it going to continue to be overheated? is it going to improve? this is something that affects not only the banks, but other parts of the economy, as well. we've seen in the consumer discretionary secto
there are things the government can do which will improve the environment for expansion. what was interesting is that cfos are relatively happy with monetary policy. >> they tell us credit is lower than it has been focus five years. but the concerns seem to be around things like infrastructure, energy policy and immigration and in particular, the general level of regulation. so what cfos are saying to us is what worries them are things more around the microsooidz side of the economy. >> business hasn't really come up with a view for that, hasn't it? >> we'll see what comes out of that. >> thank you for joining us. if you have any thoughts or comments, please e-mail us, worldwide@cnbc.com. >>> we're getting more details on japan's xlumtry budget. kitadai-san, hello. >> hello, ross. the government has compiled an outstanding for fiscal 2012 valued at more than $14 billion. the new liberal democratic led government plans to spend a large portion of the funds on public projects. the budget will focus on targets to introduce resistant construction standards at schools and hospitals, plus provide f
environment. there are still plenty of people who think the debt ceiling issues could be a debacle. february 15th, a little earlier than expected, a lot of people floating ideas that moody's might downgrade the u.s. debt sometime this quarter, if there's no grand bargain that ever appears, and that looks increasingly unlikely. i'm in the camp that the risk is to the down side on the stock market right now. earnings today, as you just mentioned here, look, the question has been whether or not putry was the trough in earnings that things would get better from here. it's going to be modest improvement. q4 isn't looking that great. we're only looking at roughly 3% improvement in earnings. that's not great. top line growth has been nonexistent throughout last year. q3 top line growth was zero. zero. we haven't seen that in a long time. you want to know how weird that is? the ten-year eenaverage is 7%. maybe it will be 3%. that's the hope. it's coming down as we're going in. so we may be at a trough in the third quarter, but the fourth quarter certainly isn't going to be gangbusters right now here
Search Results 0 to 29 of about 30 (some duplicates have been removed)